2019 Course Outcomes

The course assessment method will be by the use of quizzes at the end of each session. Course Program (without outcomes listed)

NOTICE: The 2019 BBTC Program will apply for the ABSA International (American Biological Safety Association) Certification Maintenance Points (CM Pts) for biosafety professionals:

General Biosafety and Biosecurity Session: July 2019 – General Session Instructors


July ?

General
Time:
Philosophy of Global BBTC; Ethics and Culture of Biosafety
Bob Ellis, BBTC Director, and Colorado State University Director of Biosafety, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA

LEARNING OUTCOMES: (General)
Upon completion of the above session, participants will be able to:
– list mechanisms utilized to build a safe research environment
– describe how to apply the concepts of biosafety learned in the BBTC-Global
– define an integrated, comprehensive biosafety program

July ?

General
Time:
The Importance of Safe Research Practices
Jim Welch, Elizabeth R. Griffin Foundation

LEARNING OUTCOMES: (General)
Upon completion of the above session, participants will be able to:
– list how lapses in local biosafety affect global biosafety perceptions
– list how a comprehensive biosafety program benefits everyone in infectious disease research
– list mechanisms utilized to establish a bio-safe culture

July ?

General
Time:
Risk Communication, Risk Assessment, and Risk Management
Sean Kaufman, Sean Kaufman, Behavior–Based Improvement Solutions, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

LEARNING OUTCOMES: (General)
Upon completion of the above session, participants will be able to:
– describe the differences between risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication
– conduct a risk assessment
– increase behavioral compliance with biosafety procedures
– list and utilize important criteria for biosafety management programs
– develop a biosafety management program


July ?

General
Time: (conclude)
Risk Communication, Risk Assessment, and Risk Management
Sean Kaufman, Sean Kaufman, Behavior–Based Improvement Solutions, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

LEARNING OUTCOMES: (General)
Upon completion of the above session, participants will be able to:
– describe the differences between risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication
– better communicate biological risk management to the public
– develop a biosafety management program
– develop proactive rather than reactive management programs

July ?

General
Time:
Design and Management of Insectaries
Nicholas Bergren, Arthropod-borne and Infectious Diseases Laboratory (AIDL), Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology Department, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA

LEARNING OUTCOMES: (General)
Upon completion of the above session, participants will be able to:
– list the basic criteria for designing insectaries
– list the most common reasons for unintentional release of insects from insectaries
– apply best management practices for insectaries
– apply insectary design criteria to optimize containment

July ?

General
Time:
BSL–2 and BSL–3 Building Design and Operations
Jerry Tews, Commissioning Biocontainment Specialist, Madison, Wisconsin, USA

LEARNING OUTCOMES: (General)
Upon completion of the above session, participants will be able to:
– List required and recommended design criteria for BSL-2 and BSL-3 facilities
– Identify resources for design planning
– Identify potential pitfalls in BSL-2 and BSL-3 laboratory design
– List ongoing operational requirements for biocontainment facilities


July ?

General
Time:
The U. S. Select Agent Program; and Stewardship of Infectious Agents
Bob Ellis, BBTC Director; Professor, MIP Department; and Colorado State University Director of Biosafety, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA

LEARNING OUTCOMES: (General)
Upon completion of the above session, participants will be able to:
– define when registration is needed and how to register an entity
– state the basics of the Select Agent regulations
– understand the Select Agent Tier 1 regulations
– state when select agent program amendments are required
– describe how to request an amendment to an entity’s current registration
– understand the meaning of “stewardship” of infectious agents at their institutions
– outline a plan of action for initiating a “stewardship of infectious agents” program

July ?

General
Time:
Preparing for and Responding to Audits and Inspections
Joe Kozlovac, Agency Biosafety Officer, USDA–ARS, Beltsville, Maryland, USA

LEARNING OUTCOMES: (General)
Upon completion of the above session, participants will be able to:
– prepare for audits and inspections
– host an audit or inspection
– know what should not be part of an inspection or audit
– properly report results of audits and inspections


July ?

General
Time:
rDNA/Synthetic NA (recombinant DNA) Guidelines; and Dual Use Research of Concern: Guidelines and Oversight
Bob Ellis, BBTC Director; Professor, MIP Department; and Colorado State University Director of Biosafety, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA

LEARNING OUTCOMES: (General)
Upon completion of the above session, participants will be able to:
– differentiate between exempt and non-exempt rDNA research
– apply the rDNA Guidelines to many types of different research projects
– define and apply the requirements for the composition of Institutional Biosafety Committees
– differentiate between synthetic DNA which is exempt and that which is non-exempt according to the NIH Guidelines
– understand the criteria for recognizing Dual Use Research of Concern (DURC)
– assist the research community in recognizing and mitigating DURC
– incorporate DURC in training programs

July ?

General
Time:
Clinical and Public Health Lab Biosafety
Michael Pentella, Director of the State Hygienic Laboratory (SHL), University of Iowa College of Public Health, Iowa City, Iowa, USA

LEARNING OUTCOMES: (General)
– Outline a Biosafety Program which addresses the safe containment and analysis of specimens submitted to a hospital clinical laboratory or a public health laboratory.
– Implement a program that would enable public health lab personnel to safely collect specimens in the field.
– Suggest mechanisms for handling specimens which would enhance the safety of the lab personnel and patients in a hospital environment.


July ?

General
Time:
Going Mobile – Audits, Inspections and Data Collection
Patty Olinger, Assistant Vice-President, Office of Research Administration; and Director, Environmental, Health, and Safety Office, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

LEARNING OUTCOMES: (General)
– understand the benefits of mobile platforms for lab audits and inspections
– develop entity specific applications of mobile audit and inspection platforms
– prepare for audits and inspections
– properly report results of audits and inspections

July ?

General
Time:
High Efficiency Particle Air Filters (HEPA) and Biosafety Cabinet Certification
Sara Cope, Assistant Biosafety Officer, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA

LEARNING OUTCOMES: (General)
Upon completion of the above session, participants will be able to:
– describe HEPA filter functions
– differentiate the classes of biosafety cabinets
– list criteria used to certify biosafety cabinets
– describe proper technique for decontamination of a biosafety cabinet
– understand why biosafety cabinets require annual certification



Animal Biosafety and Biosecurity Session: July 2019 – Animal Session Instructors


July ?

Animal
Time:
Lab Animal Biosafety Level–2 (ABSL–2) and ABSL–3 Containment and Management
Lon Kendall, Director, Laboratory Animal Resources, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA

LEARNING OUTCOMES: (Animal)
Upon completion of the above sessions, participants will be able to:
– list containment criteria necessary for Small Animal ABSL-2 and ABSL-3 facilities
– describe the difference between PPE for ABSL-2 and ABSL-3
– define mechanisms of decontamination of small animal ABSL-3 facilities
– list vaccines which may be available for added protection of individuals who have contact with the research animals

July ?

Animal
Time: (conclude)
Lab Animal Biosafety Level–2 (ABSL–2) and ABSL–3 Containment and Management
Lon Kendall, Director, Laboratory Animal Resources, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA

LEARNING OUTCOMES: (Animal)
Upon completion of the above sessions, participants will be able to:
– define methods to prevent development of allergies in lab animal care personnel
– outline a training program for research personnel
– prepare for and respond to audits and inspections

July ?

Animal
Time:
Large Animal Facilities and Containment, Animal Biosafety Level–2 (ABSL–2) and ABSL–3
Erin Smith, Biosafety Specialist at Kansas State University’s Biosecurity Research Institute (BRI), Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas, USA

LEARNING OUTCOMES: (Animal)
Upon completion of the above session, participants will be able to:
– list several criteria necessary for Large Animal ABSL-3 facilities that differ from Small Animal facilities
– explain the difference between ABSL-3 and ABSL-3 AG (Agriculture)
– practice safe handling of large animals in ABSL-3 and ABSL-3 AG containment


July ?

Animal
Time:(conclude)
Large Animal Facilities and Containment, Animal Biosafety Level–2 (ABSL–2) and ABSL–3
Erin Smith, Biosafety Specialist at Kansas State University’s Biosecurity Research Institute (BRI), Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas, USA

LEARNING OUTCOMES: (Animal)
Upon completion of the above session, participants will be able to:
– define mechanisms of decontamination of large animal ABSL-3 facilities
– respond to emergencies in BSL-3 and BSL-3 AG large animal containment
– describe the PPE necessary for different types of ABSL-3 research
– prepare for and respond to audits and inspections

July ?

Animal
Time:
ABSL–3 Research with Multiple Agents and Multiple Animal Species
Bob Ellis, BBTC Director; Professor, MIP Department; and Colorado State University Director of Biosafety, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA

LEARNING OUTCOMES: (Animal)
Upon completion of the above session, participants will be able to:
– list containment criteria necessary for Animal ABSL-2 and ABSL-3 facilities
– describe the difference between PPE for ABSL-2 and ABSL-3
– list vaccines which may be available for added protection of individuals who have contact with the research animals
– outline a training program for research personnel
– prepare for and respond to audits and inspections


July ?

Animal
Time:
Veterinary Hospital and Clinic Biosecurity (infection control) and Agricultural Premises Biosecurity
Paul Morley, Professor and Veterinary Teaching Hospital Biosecurity Officer, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA

LEARNING OUTCOMES: (Animal)
Upon completion of the above session, participants will be able to:
– explain the purpose and mechanisms of veterinary hospital Biosecurity
– outline a surveillance program for a Veterinary Teaching Hospital or clinic
– design systems for controlling traffic in Veterinary Teaching Hospital/clinic large animal wards
– define mechanisms of disease surveillance for a feedlot

July ?

Animal
Time:
Biosafety in Prion Disease Research
Candace Mathiason, Associate Professor, MIP Department, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA

LEARNING OUTCOMES: (Animal)
Upon completion of the above session, participants will be able to:
– describe how abnormal prions multiply within a host
– describe how prions are detected
– describe why normal prions do not cause disease
– describe how abnormal prions can be contaminated or destroyed in vitro


July ?

Animal
Time:
ABSL-2 Research in the Field
Bob Ellis, BBTC Director; Professor, MIP Department; and Colorado State University Director of Biosafety, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA

LEARNING OUTCOMES: (Animal)
Upon completion of the above session, participants will be able to:
– understand how to conduct risk assessment and risk management for field research
– describe risks in the field which do not apply to laboratory research
– understand how to adapt personal protective equipment to field research



Plant Biosafety and Biosecurity Session: July 2019 – Plant Session Instructors


July ?

Plant
Time:
Crop Security and Disease; Overview of the U.S.A. National Plant Diagnostic Network
Thaddeus Gourd, PhD, Colorado State University Extension Director and Agriculture Agent for Adams County, Colorado, Brighton, Colorado, USA

LEARNING OUTCOMES: (Plant)
Upon completion of the above session, participants will be able to:
– understand criteria for crop biosecurity
– understand and describe how the crop security network functions
– define the diseases that are the main focus of the crop diagnostic network
– understand and describe how a plant diagnostic lab functions


July ?

Plant
Time:
Regulations and Permit Procedures for Plants, Plant Pests and Pathogens, Including Transgenics and Soils
Steven Ziegenfuss , Biological Safety Specialist, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, USA

LEARNING OUTCOMES: (Plant)
Upon completion of the above session, participants will be able to:
– state when USDA (United States Department of Agriculture) permits are required for shipping of animal specimens
– state when USDA permits are required for shipping of plant materials
– state when USDA permits are required for shipping soil
– understand how to successfully register and apply for USDA permits
– contact the correct personnel when permit problems and questions arise
– prepare for and respond to audits and inspections

July ?

Plant
Time:
Biosafety in Research Greenhouses and other Specialized Containment Facilities – Principles and Guidelines
Dann Adair, Controlled Environments, Inc., North Branch, Minnesota, USA

LEARNING OUTCOMES: (Plant)
Upon completion of the above session, participants will be able to:
– find and use the guidelines for containment greenhouse design
– apply NIH plant biosafety levels to plant research
– describe the differences between plant containment levels Biosafety Safety Level-1 Plant (BL1-P) – BL4 – P


July ?

Plant
Time: (continue)
Biosafety in Research Greenhouses and other Specialized Containment Facilities – Administrative Controls and Management
Dann Adair, Controlled Environments, Inc., North Branch, Minnesota, USA

LEARNING OUTCOMES: (Plant)
Upon completion of the above session, participants will be able to:
– understand and apply greenhouse management principles
– describe the differences between plant containment levels Biosafety Safety Level-1 Plant (BL1-P) – BL4 – P
– list and apply the four main elements of greenhouse containment

July ?

Plant
Time: (conclude)
Biosafety in Research Greenhouses and other Specialized Containment Facilities – Design and Construction
Dann Adair, Controlled Environments, Inc., North Branch, Minnesota, USA

LEARNING OUTCOMES: (Plant)
Upon completion of the above session, participants will be able to:
– find and use the guidelines for containment greenhouse design
– understand basic construction principles for greenhouses
– list and apply the four main elements of greenhouse containment


July ?

Plant
Time:
Transgenic Plants in the Laboratory, the Greenhouse and in the Field
Mauricio Antunes, Assistant Professor, Biology Department, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA

LEARNING OUTCOMES: (Plant)
Upon completion of the above session, participants will be able to:
– describe containment principles for transgenic plants
– understand and describe mechanisms for producing transgenic plants
– define criteria for field research with transgenic plants

July ?

Plant
Time:
Agricultural Biosecurity: Why it’s important. Steps to compliance
Jillian M. Lang, Research Associate, Bioagricultural Sciences and Pest Management Department, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA

LEARNING OUTCOMES: (Plant)
Upon completion of the above session, participants will be able to:
– understand and describe a select agent program for plant diseases
– describe containment principles for plants with infectious diseases
– prepare for and respond to audits and inspections